On Mexico Issue 69

Mattias Rust:

“Audi Mexico has started the recruitment of 200 people to work in their new plant. By 2016, 3,800 people are expected to be hired to assemble the Q5 van. We have received over 30,000 applications. This shows the excitement in the region to work for the company. Currently, 64 young interns have started training and 45 of them were sent to Germany to work under the dual education concept.”
Mattias Rust, Human Resources Vice-president for Audi 

Carlos Ghosn:

“We think that the Mexican market should continue evolving, especially if measures were taken to restrict to a degree the importation of used vehicles from the U.S. Every measure restricting somewhat the vehicle flow from the north would generate larger growth by the industry in Mexico.”
Carlos Ghosn, President, the Nissan-Renault Group 

Luis Videgaray:

“Taxes contribute to economic growth and investment and since an important taxing reform was made last year, now is the time to provide taxing stability, i.e. certainty in taxing rules. The purpose is that both companies and workers may plan ahead knowing what the rules of the game on taxing matters in upcoming years will be.”
Luis Videgaray, Minister of the Treasury 

Enrique Peña Nieto:

“In the framework of Mexico’s participation in the Davos Economic Forum it is encouraging to see the enthusiasm awaken in our country due to the structural changes being made, the platform being built to foster growth and all the social development this implies. And we still have to announce all the important investments yet to be made in Mexico that will generate employment for our country.” 
Enrique Peña Nieto, President of Mexico 

Emilio Lozoya:

“With the new legislation for foreign companies to enter into the Mexican energy sector –as Pemex aims to contribute their part with experience and work to raise efficiency– there are uncountable new stakeholders now coming to observe the opportunities already opening in Mexico.” 
Emilio Lozoya, CEO, Pemex 

Guillermo Rosales:

“Even if there are still pending issues, macroeconomic perspectives show that we will have a better year for Mexico, and this will necessarily be important for new vehicle sales. That is the reason why we are forecasting growth close to 8% over 2013.” 
Guillermo Rosales, Deputy Director of the Mexican Association of Automobiles Dealers, Asociacion Mexicana de Distribuidores de Automotores (AMDA) 

Jose Angel Gurria:

“The reforms approved in Mexico will increase productivity and competitiveness. They have the possibility to improve human capital in the medium and long terms. The key for these historical changes to yield the best fruit is staying firm in the next two stages. First, that the reforms are not diluted in the secondary laws stage. And second, that implementation and follow-up are both effective and thorough.” 
Jose Angel Gurria, General Secretary of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) 

Ildefonso Guajardo:

“I believe that the reforms undertaken in 2014 by the Executive Power may have an impact in that year. This is because many things are being planned and as companies continue coming to Mexico looking for a site for important things to develop we may start receiving the first good effects.” 
Ildefonso Guajardo, Minister of the Economy 

Gerardo Gutierrez Candiani:

“It is best for all of us if Mexico has a more balanced image, if the great opportunities and advantages offered for productive investment and employment become better known.”
Gerardo Gutierrez Candiani, President, CCE 

 

Christoph Leitl:

“We are very specialized in the automotive sector and we want to be up there in the major leagues. At the same time we are looking for partners to take advantage of Mexico’s excellent momentum.”
Christoph Leitl, President of the Austrian Federal Economic Chamber 

Carlos Fuentes:

“We have identified very specific processes in the automotive sector where there are very clear opportunities to attract foreign investment, such as forging and machining, coming as complements to the automotive sector in Mexico.”
Carlos Fuentes, International Promotion Director, ProMexico 

Peter Hall:

“Organized crime and the cost of violence for business are the main risks assessed to make investments in emerging countries. However, there are also benefits that encourage foreign investments, for instance, the size of the Mexican market and its diversification, as well as its banking system. Canadian businessmen simply do not like to run risks and Mexico still has indicators that could make investors have second thoughts.”
Peter Hall, Chief Economist with EDC